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on Mar 28, 2017

Congratulations John Weber. Great article!!!

on Mar 29, 2017

THANKS A LOT!! This is an excellent topic for our safety talks.

on Apr 3, 2017

One time one of the computer numerical control press feeders was underneath an exhaust fan opening in the ceiling. The CNC went senile because of in internal short circuit inside a sealed integrated circuit, but I had my doubts about whether rain got on it even though that could not have been the cause.

Any kind of mission critical machine should have its own roof including water shielding over busways and wireways. The roof can leak any time any place.

on Apr 3, 2017

Excellent suggestions and thanks for the great example.

on Apr 3, 2017

Picture number 4 shows copper tubing that goes directly over the bus...leaving one to wonder if they have to take that top portion of the buss off, and unbolt that section....um what shall we do with that copper water pipe?

No one has said anything about this, so maybe I am just crying wolf?!?

on Apr 4, 2017

Picture #4
Copper water pipe - condensation droplets - eventually the top portion of the buss could blow itself off with this deadly combination.

on Apr 4, 2017

Johnne, Rtek,

Both of you are doing what the article is all about. You are both looking for trouble before it happens. It's great that you can do this with photos and I am sure you both make this a part of your everyday job routine. The key lesson of the article is to find these easily visible issues and then take some type of corrective actions. As you know, when you do this you are preventing huge losses and business disruptions for your customers.

I'll fill in a few more of the blanks here. The copper pipe is the drain from a drip pan that was installed to catch water dripping through the ceiling cracks of the building. This electrical equipment is in a basement. The block wall to the right is the wall of a below-grade transformer vault that is outside of the building footprint.

The copper pipe only carries water when the ceiling leaks at the exterior grade-level joint between the building and the vault. You can see more in the extra photo I'll try to included here. It looks like the drip pan is a quick fix for something that really revolves around why is the building ceiling joint leaking in the first place?

You can see here, the process in full action. Those visual observations should lead to real root-cause problem solutions. The real question is: "How can you make the ceiling joint stop leaking?"

on Apr 6, 2017

very good tip, thanks

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