Arlington Metals Corp. has been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for 38 safety and health violations, which carry proposed penalties of $117,000. OSHA initiated a safety and health investigation in June in response to a complaint filed by the United Steel Workers Union alleging unsafe working conditions at the Franklin Park, Ill., metal strip and coil processing facility. Violations include lack of a respiratory protection program, multiple instances of inadequate machine guarding, and unsafe electrical work practices.

A total of 17 serious violations, carrying proposed penalties of $88,200, were cited December 5 and involve failing to provide machine guarding on slitters and radial arm saws; complete periodic inspections of overhead cranes within the past 12 months; and to provide guardrails and energy control procedures. Several violations relate to electrical safe work practices, such as failing to provide covers on live transformers; prevent use of extension cords when fixed wiring is required; and provide electrical protective equipment, such as gloves, fire-retardant/-rated clothing, and eye and face protection. In addition, the company failed to evaluate and determine whether any of the five production pits were permit-required confined spaces.

Twelve other-than-serious violations involve failing to conduct personal protective equipment assessments; provide a written emergency evacuation plan; post load rating signs; maintain records of crane and rope inspections; train workers on energy control procedures; and poor housekeeping practices that allowed wood dust to accumulate and create a fire hazard.

OSHA issued several citations in August and October, carrying proposed fines of $28,800, as part of the concurrent safety and health investigation. In August, OSHA cited three serious violations for lack of fire protection training; lockout/tagout procedures to control the unexpected operation of equipment during service and maintenance; and guarding against immovable fire hazards during welding operations. In October, the company received five serious citations for modifying a powered industrial truck without written permission from the manufacturer, and for failing to develop a written respiratory protection program, including medical evaluation, training and fit testing workers for proper respiratory equipment.'

Additionally, one other-than-serious violation cited in October involves lack of effective hazard communication training.

The citations may be viewed at: http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Arlington_Metals_Corporation_910411_12052013.pdf

http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Arlington_Metals_Corporation_910398_12052013.pdf