Motors covered by the new energy efficiency requirements (i.e., manufactured after Dec. 19, 2010) for sale in the United States include:

  • General-purpose motors (Subtype I) with a power rating of at least 1 hp but not greater than 200 hp (these are motors that were affected by EPAct in 1997), shall have a nominal full-load efficiency that is not less than as defined in NEMA MG–1 (2009) Table 12–12. Subtype I motors include:
    • 230V or 460V, 60 Hz, NEMA Design A or B and IEC
      Design N, 2-, 4-, or 6-pole induction motors
    • IEC metric frame motors, 90 frame and up
      (excluding 100 frame)
  • General-purpose motors (Subtype II) with a power rating of at least 1 hp but no more than 200 hp shall have a nominal full-load efficiency that is not less than as defined in MG–1 (2009) Table 12–11. Subtype II motors include:
    • U-Frame motor
    • Design C motor
    • Close-coupled pump motor
    • Footless motor
    • Vertical solid-shaft normal thrust motor (tested in a
      horizontal configuration)
    • 8-pole motor (900 rpm)
    • 3-phase motor with voltage of no more than 600V
      (other than 230V or 460V)
    • Fire pump motors
  • NEMA Design B or IEC Design N, general purpose electric motor, with a power rating at least 200 hp but no more than 500 hp shall have a nominal full-load efficiency that is not less than as defined in MG-1 (2009) Table 12–11.
  • Motors mounted to equipment imported into the United States.

Note: Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) regulations take effect on Jan. 1, 2011, and differ slightly from U.S. laws. Canada adds footless motors and all voltages less than 600V to the 1-hp to 200-hp motor category requiring premium efficiency rating per NEMA MG 1 (2009), Table 12-12.

Motors not covered by the new energy efficiency requirements include:

  • Single-phase motors
  • DC motors
  • 48 or 56 frame motors
  • Fractional hp motors
  • Totally enclosed non-ventilated and totally enclosed air-over motors
  • Design D motors with high slip
  • Inverter duty motors with windings optimized for adjustable speed drive
  • Customized OEM mounted motors
  • Intermittent duty motors
  • Integral motors with gearing or brake, where motor can’t be used separately
  • Submersible motors