New AFCI Requirements in 2014 NEC

54 replies [Last post]
user-1071472's picture
Offline
Joined: 2016-11-06

Without getting bogged down in the discussion about the efficacy or need for AFCIs, I'd just like to know what the requirements are for Alameda County in California. The California Electrical Code seems to be saying we're on the 2013 rules, but where is the authoritative source for this information?

RAY SR.'s picture
Offline
Joined: 2014-03-10

GFCIs are good, life-saving devices. We've all had one trip and prevent a shock. They work. We depend on GFCIs for hot tubs, bath tubs with circulating pumps, etc.

AFCIs are no good. They don't save lives. Smoke detectors do that, and we can test them. There is no test for an AFCI, except the button on the device. You must make a series and parallel arc to test them.

The Code should read, if you have fire/CO2 detectors no AFCI is required.

P.S. Show me an arc where a homeowner paid $1,000.00 to put out.

user-1118132's picture
Offline
Joined: 2017-01-09

Why can't the manufacturers make something along the lines of a whole house surge protector and do it for arc fault protection? It's such a scam that the prices of the arc fault circuit interrupter still haven't come down. Look how cheap the LEDs got, but they're also not required. Such a scam! Make a whole house arc fault device, sell it for $250, and call it a day.

Paul Abernathy's picture
Offline
Joined: 2012-12-21

[quote=RAY SR.] GFCIs are good, life-saving devices. We've all had one trip and prevent a shock. They work. We depend on GFCIs for hot tubs, bath tubs with circulating pumps, etc.

AFCIs are no good. They don't save lives. Smoke detectors do that, and we can test them. There is no test for an AFCI, except the button on the device. You must make a series and parallel arc to test them.

The Code should read, if you have fire/CO2 detectors no AFCI is required.

P.S. Show me an arc where a homeowner paid $1,000.00 to put out.[ end quote]

Greetings Mr. Ray Sr.:

Firstly, GFCIs have been around since the 60s and have been given time to prove their worth. They also met with skepticism back when they were introduced and as you stated I think now we know they work.

Second, AFCIs most certainly save lives when it stops a potential arc that could result in a fire while sleeping or out of town and things happen. Also just to correct you, they are called Smoke Alarms when dealing with residential applications.

Third, you do NOT have to make an arc to test AFCI devices. The test button is more than adequate to test their function and ascertain their reliability.

And lastly, where did you come up with that research on the comment about not needing AFCIs if you have fire/CO2 devices. Frankly, you are missing the boat. Those devices detect issues AFTER the occurrence has started while AFCIs detect the issue before it becomes an occurrence. There's a big difference here.

Do AFCIs always work? NO! Do they accidentally activate on frequency issues? Some might but that is being weeded out. No activation should be blindly taken as a nuisance trip in my opinion. Lastly, you pay insurance every month (Obamacare Mandate) just in case you get sick, right? AFCIs are cheap insurance for your wiring and the largest investment of your life. People are looking at this from the wrong perspective and only looking at the dollar signs and not the monumental advancements that has been achieved.

Please or Register to post comments.

What you need to know?

1. Forum Rules 2. Forum Login

 

Featured Video

Join the Discussion on EC&M Talk
EC&M Learning Center


Connect With Us

Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×