Dishwasher GFCI Requirement

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rbarnett's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-04

I see the 2014 NEC now requires the dishwasher to be GFCI protected. I notice 210.8(D) says "GFCI protection shall be required for outlets that supply dishwashers..." So, I can't use a GFCI receptacle and plug my diswahser in? Sounds like I have to install a GFCI breaker to protect the entire branch circuit. Otherwise this new requirement would have just been added to 201.8(A) for receptacles. Am I reading that correctly? 

steveo's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-10

I think it may stem from the fact that many dishwashers are hard wired and the fact that any GFCI shall be readily accessible.

IvanLeg's picture
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Joined: 2014-01-27

Be careful, as AFCI is now also required in "KITCHENS". My thoughts are to install a faceless GFI on the countertop with AFCI protection in the panel. There will be a combination AFCI/GFCI breaker at some point. See NEC 210.12

lannjenks's picture
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Joined: 2013-12-10

I'm curious to see how this is going to work. In my opinion, you're going to have to use an accessible GFCI receptacle or device at some point in the circuit because the kitchen outlets are also required to be AFCI protected now.

Ohms law's picture
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Joined: 2013-12-07

I would think a dead front GFCI would suffice under the sink and a AFCI breaker at the panel. I have learned that manufacturers have made combination type AFCI/GFCI breakers and the only company that has them on shelves are Cutler Hammer so far.

As for my local AHJ they will except a dead front under the sink, they consider that location as readily accessible.

reichmand's picture
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Joined: 2013-11-07

Does this new requirement preclude the hard wiring of a DW as has been common practice? I don't have a copy handy of the 2014 regs. but is the wording "GFCI outlets that supply dishwashers"? If there is no outlet, then are the old methods acceptable?

meby's picture
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Joined: 2012-04-17

Here's the exact wording as printed in the 2014 Edition of the NEC.

"210.8(D) Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit. GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations."

theJcK's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-10

So I interpret that as meaning that the dishwasher ONLY has be to GFI protected if its not hardwired.

journeymanjoe's picture
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Joined: 2014-02-19

The definition of an outlet from Article 100 is, "A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment." Which means receptacle outlet, lighting outlet, or hardwired.

Eastpoint Electric's picture
Joined: 2014-02-06

Roger that, jouneymanjoe!
We, as electricians, are often lazy in our usage of electrical terminology. Trade names (think Scotchlock or Sawzall) and widely accepted slang are used so freely that they at times, undermine our understanding of the NEC. We should all strive to learn and understand the sometimes arcane but very specific language of the NEC. After all, not all luminaires are lighting fixtures.

theJcK's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-10

so where is the "outlet" in the hardwire method?.. the wire leads?..

jasonschaefer's picture
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Joined: 2013-11-14

I believe that Square D now makes a combination GFCI/Arc Fault Circuit Breaker.

I know that AFCI requirements have expanded into kitchens. Does that include dedicated receptacles or just counter top receptacles?

journeymanjoe's picture
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Joined: 2014-02-19

[quote=theJcK]so where is the "outlet" in the hardwire method?.. the wire leads?..[/quote]

The junction box is the outlet. It would be a receptacle outlet if it had a receptacle installed; a lighting outlet if it had a luminaire installed; and just an outlet if it was hardwired. Imagine uninstalling the equipment, you would remove the wire back to the box, so that would be considered "the point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment."

Review the definitions in Art. 100 for Outlet, Receptacle, Receptacle Outlet, Luminaire, and Lighting Outlet; after reading all of these it should make more sense.

W A Werning's picture
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Joined: 2014-02-12

Check the definition of "utilization equipment" in Article 100. This also includes, but is not limited to: Buzzers, motion detectors, alarms, clothes dryers.

It's a matter of time until kitchen waste disposers will be included for AFCI and or GFCI protection...and then kitchen range vent-hoods.

theJcK's picture
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Joined: 2014-03-10

So last night I reviewed the definition of outlet, but personally for me the review of GFCI in Art. 100 did the trick. Not sure what I was thinking, but I understand that the def. of device can mean receptacle, circuit breaker, etc. so this makes me wonder why not just add AFCI-GFCI protection to the main breaker? Is this the phase in plan of our industry?

journeymanjoe's picture
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Joined: 2014-02-19

Having AFCI and/or GFCI individual breakers would be fine, but not the main. One ground or arcing fault would shut down the entire building, leaving everyone in the dark; not to mention making it difficult to determine which circuit the problem is in.

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